The brilliant PubMed database
The brilliant PubMed database

PubMed- Latest free Papers on ADRCs

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PubMed comprises more than 26 million citations for biomedical literature from MEDLINE, life science journals, and online books. Citations may include links to full-text content from PubMed Central and publisher web sites.

The brilliant thing about PubMed is that all scientific publishers whatever their ranking publishes at PubMed too- so it is comprised of everything- the latest greatest that we do not understand since written by and for scientists, but also the simple stuff which can be very enlightening for every mortal.

Anyway- to me- this query is pretty brilliant- it is on "Adipose + Derived + Regeneretive + Cells" and withe restriction- free papers only!

The below is the result of the day... i.e. come back often, since the listing of this page changes often....

Below you will find the feed of the latest "Free articles" with theme: Adipose Derived Regeneretive Cells"- i.e. ADRCs...

pubmed: adipose derived rege...

  • Exosomes secreted by adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells regulate type I collagen metabolism in fibroblasts from women with stress urinary incontinence.
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    Exosomes secreted by adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells regulate type I collagen metabolism in fibroblasts from women with stress urinary incontinence.

    Stem Cell Res Ther. 2018 Jun 13;9(1):159

    Authors: Liu X, Wang S, Wu S, Hao Q, Li Y, Guo Z, Wang W

    Abstract
    BACKGROUND: Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) have gained credibility as a therapeutic tool partly due to their potential to secrete factors such as cytokines and chemokines. Recently, exosomes, which mediate intercellular communication by delivering biomolecules such as mRNA and miRNA into recipient cells, have gained attention as a new and valuable therapeutic strategy in regenerative medicine. However, the potential role of exosomes secreted by adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (adMSC-Exos) in collagen metabolism is not well understood. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of adMSC-Exos on collagen metabolism in cultured fibroblasts from women with stress urinary incontinence (SUI).
    METHODS: Periurethral vaginal wall tissues of postmenopausal women with or without SUI were collected during transvaginal surgical procedures. Primary fibroblasts were cultured from periurethral vaginal wall tissues, and the levels of type I collagen mRNA and protein were examined by qRT-PCR and western blotting. MSC were isolated from human adipose tissue by enzymatic digestion. Exosomes were prepared by ultracentrifugation of adMSC-conditioned medium (adMSC-CM) and were confirmed by transmission electron microscopy and western blot analyses. The effects of adMSC-CM and adMSC-Exos were assessed using qRT-PCR and western blotting.
    RESULTS: The type I collagen content was significantly decreased in periurethral vaginal wall tissues and cultured vaginal fibroblasts from women with SUI. adMSC-CM increased the expression of the col1a1 gene in vaginal fibroblasts from women with SUI. adMSC-Exos could be successfully isolated from adMSC-CM and could be transferred to fibroblasts efficiently. adMSC-Exos increased the expression of col1a1 in vaginal fibroblasts from women with SUI, and when the fibroblasts were treated with adMSC-Exos, the expression levels of TIMP-1 and TIMP-3 in fibroblasts were upregulated, with significant downregulation of MMP-1 and MMP-2 expression levels.
    CONCLUSIONS: adMSC-Exos increased type I collagen contents by increasing collagen synthesis and decreasing collagen degradation in vaginal fibroblasts from women with SUI. adMSC-Exos may be a novel therapeutic approach for treating SUI.

    PMID: 29895333 [PubMed - in process]

  • Ovarian Hormones Regulate the Production of Adipocytes From Bone Marrow-Derived Cells.
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    Ovarian Hormones Regulate the Production of Adipocytes From Bone Marrow-Derived Cells.

    Front Endocrinol (Lausanne). 2018;9:276

    Authors: Gavin KM, Sullivan TM, Kohrt WM, Majka SM, Klemm DJ

    Abstract
    Sex differences in body fat distribution and menopause-associated shifts in regional adiposity suggest that sex hormones play an important role in regulating the differentiation and distribution of adipocytes, but the underlying mechanisms have not been fully explained. The aim of this study was to determine whether ovarian hormone status influences the production and distribution of adipocytes in adipose tissue arising from bone marrow-derived cells. Nine- to ten-week-old ovariectomized (OVX), surgery naïve (WT), and estrogen receptor alpha knockout (αERKO) mice underwent bone marrow transplantation from luciferase or green fluorescent protein expressing donors. A subset of OVX animals had estradiol (E2) added back. Eight-weeks posttransplant, whole body and gonadal fat BM-derived adipocyte production was highest in OVX and αERKO mice, which was attenuated in OVX mice by E2 add-back. All groups demonstrated the highest bone marrow derived adipocyte (BMDA) production in the gonadal adipose depot, a visceral fat depot in mice. Taken together, the loss of ovarian hormones increases the production of BMDAs. If translatable across species, production of BMDA may be a mechanism by which visceral adiposity increases in estrogen-deficient postmenopausal women.

    PMID: 29892267 [PubMed]

  • Effect of Different Preconditioning Regimens on the Expression Profile of Murine Adipose-Derived Stromal/Stem Cells.
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    Effect of Different Preconditioning Regimens on the Expression Profile of Murine Adipose-Derived Stromal/Stem Cells.

    Int J Mol Sci. 2018 Jun 10;19(6):

    Authors: Baer PC, Overath JM, Urbschat A, Schubert R, Koch B, Bohn AA, Geiger H

    Abstract
    Stem cell-based therapies require cells with a maximum regenerative capacity in order to support regeneration after tissue injury and organ failure. Optimization of this regenerative potential of mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSC) or their conditioned medium by in vitro preconditioning regimens are considered to be a promising strategy to improve the release of regenerative factors. In the present study, MSC were isolated from inguinal adipose tissue (mASC) from C57BL/6 mice, cultured, and characterized. Then, mASC were either preconditioned by incubation in a hypoxic environment (0.5% O₂), or in normoxia in the presence of murine epidermal growth factor (EGF) or tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) for 48 h. Protein expression was measured by a commercially available array. Selected factors were verified by PCR analysis. The expression of 83 out of 308 proteins (26.9%) assayed was found to be increased after preconditioning with TNFα, whereas the expression of 61 (19.8%) and 70 (22.7%) proteins was increased after incubation with EGF or in hypoxia, respectively. Furthermore, we showed the proliferation-promoting effects of the preconditioned culture supernatants on injured epithelial cells in vitro. Our findings indicate that each preconditioning regimen tested induced an individual expression profile with a wide variety of factors, including several growth factors and cytokines, and therefore may enhance the regenerative potential of mASC for cell-based therapies.

    PMID: 29890767 [PubMed - in process]

  • Design of a single-arm clinical trial of regenerative therapy by periurethral injection of adipose-derived regenerative cells for male stress urinary incontinence in Japan: the ADRESU study protocol.
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    Design of a single-arm clinical trial of regenerative therapy by periurethral injection of adipose-derived regenerative cells for male stress urinary incontinence in Japan: the ADRESU study protocol.

    BMC Urol. 2017 Sep 25;17(1):89

    Authors: Shimizu S, Yamamoto T, Nakayama S, Hirakawa A, Kuwatsuka Y, Funahashi Y, Matsukawa Y, Takanari K, Toriyama K, Kamei Y, Narimoto K, Yamanishi T, Ishizuka O, Mizuno M, Gotoh M

    Abstract
    BACKGROUND: Male stress urinary incontinence is a prevalent condition after radical prostatectomy. While the standard recommendation for the management of urine leakage is pelvic floor muscle training, its efficacy is still unsatisfactory. Therefore, we have focused on regenerative therapy, which consists of administering a periurethral injection of autologous regenerative cells from adipose tissue, separated using the Celution® system. Based on an interim data analysis of our exploratory study, we confirmed the efficacy and acceptable safety profile of this treatment. Accordingly, we began discussions with Japanese regulatory authorities regarding the development of this therapy in Japan. The Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare suggested that we implement a clinical trial of a new medical device based on the Pharmaceutical Affaires Act in Japan. Next, we discussed the design of this investigator-initiated clinical trial (the ADRESU study) aimed at evaluating the efficacy and safety of this therapy, in a consultation meeting with the Pharmaceuticals and Medical Device Agency.
    METHODS: The ADRESU study is an open-label, multi-center, single-arm study involving a total of 45 male stress urinary incontinence patients with mild-to-moderate urine leakage persisting more than 1 year after prostatectomy, in spite of behavioral and pharmacological therapies. The primary endpoint is the rate of patients at 52 weeks with improvement of urine leakage volume defined as a reduction from baseline greater than 50% by 24-h pad test. Our specific hypothesis is that the primary endpoint result will be higher than a pre-specified threshold of 10%.
    DISCUSSION: The ADRESU study is the first clinical trial of regenerative treatment for stress urinary incontinence by adipose-derived regenerative cells using the Celution® system based on the Japanese Pharmaceutical Affaires Act. We will evaluate the efficacy and safety in this trial to provide an adequate basis for marketing approval with the final objective of making this novel therapy widely available for Japanese patients.
    TRIAL REGISTRATION: This trial was registered at the University Hospital Medical information Network Clinical Trial Registry (UMIN-CTR Unique ID: UMIN000017901 ; Registered July 1, 2015) and at ClinicalTrials.gov (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02529865 ; Registered August 18, 2015).

    PMID: 28946874 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

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