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Medical Xpress is a web-based medical and health news service that is part of the renowned Science X network. Based on the years of experience as a Phys.org medical research channel, started in April 2011, Medical Xpress became a separate website.
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The News summary below is based on the query - "Adipose + Derived + Cells"
 

Medical Xpress - latest medical and health news stories

Medical Xpress internet news portal provides the latest news on Health and Medicine.
  • Obesity study reports the heritability of adipose tissue composition
    A multi-institutional team of researchers led by Jan-Wilhelm Kornfeld, Elena Schmidt and Martin Bilban has made a groundbreaking discovery in obesity research.
  • Healthy fat cells uncouple obesity from diabetes
    About 422 million people around the world, including more than 30 million Americans, have diabetes. Approximately ninety percent of them have type 2 diabetes. People with this condition cannot effectively use insulin, a hormone made by the pancreas that helps the body turn blood sugar (glucose) into energy.
  • Platelet-rich plasma does not promote stem cell-mediated cartilage repair
    Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is believed to provide pain relief and help improve joint function in degenerative joint disease, but a new study has shown that it does not act by promoting stem cell proliferation or enhance the cartilage formation capabilities of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). The effects of PRP treatment on cartilage formation and chondrogenesis in the presence of adult human MSCs derived from two different sources are reported in the study published in Tissue Engineering, Part A.
  • Researchers discover gene that controls bone-to-fat ratio in bone marrow
    In an unexpected discovery, UCLA researchers have found that a gene previously known to control human metabolism also controls the equilibrium of bone and fat in bone marrow as well as how an adult stem cell expresses its final cell type. The findings could lead to a better understanding of the disruption of bone-to-fat ratio in bone marrow as well as its health consequences, and also point to the gene as a promising therapeutic target in the treatment of osteoporosis and skeletal aging.
  • Removing barriers to healing
    Severe inflammation caused by a patient's immune system can be deadly, but stem cells found in human fat could provide new ways to protect against this toxic reaction.
  • Culprit in reducing effectiveness of insulin identified
    Scientists at Osaka University have discovered that Stromal derived factor-1 (SDF-1) secreted from adipocytes reduces the effectiveness of insulin in adipocytes and decreased insulin-induced glucose uptake.
  • Obesity may promote resistance to antiangiogenic therapy for breast cancer
    Obesity—which is already known to reduce survival in several types of cancer—may explain the ineffectiveness of angiogenesis inhibitors in the treatment of breast cancer. A research team led by Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) investigators describes finding, for the first time, that obesity and obesity-related molecular factors appear to induce resistance to antiangiogenic therapy in breast cancer patients and in two mouse models of the disease. Their report in Science Translational Medicine also details specific obesity-related factors underlying that resistance and outlines potential therapeutic strategies that may overcome it.
  • Mesenchymal stem cell therapy: Holding promise for feline inflammatory diseases
    Stem cell therapy is acknowledged as having great potential for the treatment of a variety of diseases in both people and animals. The use of bone marrow-derived stem cells is well established in the treatment of human cancer patients, and veterinary applications for bone marrow- and adipose-derived stem cells are being evaluated.
  • FDA-approved clinical trial tests stem cells to heal wounds
    Sanford Health is launching its second adipose-derived stem cell clinical trial - this one to focus on non-healing leg wounds.
  • Study shows protein called 'survivin' which protects fat cells from death is at higher levels in obese people
    New research presented at this year's European Congress on Obesity (ECO) in Porto, Portugal (17-20 May) shows the obese people have higher levels of a protein called survivin, which protects fat-containing adipocyte cells in the body from being destroyed. The study was led by Dr Sonia Fernández-Veledo and Dr Joan Vendrell and is presented at ECO by Dr Miriam Ejarque, all of the Pere Virgili Institute, Rovira i Virgili University, CIBERDEM, Taragona, Spain.

 

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