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Medical Xpress is a web-based medical and health news service that is part of the renowned Science X network. Based on the years of experience as a Phys.org medical research channel, started in April 2011, Medical Xpress became a separate website.
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The News summary below is based on the query - "Adipose + Derived + Cells"
 

Medical Xpress - latest medical and health news stories

Medical Xpress internet news portal provides the latest news on Health and Medicine.
  • FDA-approved clinical trial tests stem cells to heal wounds
    Sanford Health is launching its second adipose-derived stem cell clinical trial - this one to focus on non-healing leg wounds.
  • Study shows protein called 'survivin' which protects fat cells from death is at higher levels in obese people
    New research presented at this year's European Congress on Obesity (ECO) in Porto, Portugal (17-20 May) shows the obese people have higher levels of a protein called survivin, which protects fat-containing adipocyte cells in the body from being destroyed. The study was led by Dr Sonia Fernández-Veledo and Dr Joan Vendrell and is presented at ECO by Dr Miriam Ejarque, all of the Pere Virgili Institute, Rovira i Virgili University, CIBERDEM, Taragona, Spain.
  • Postbiotic could lower glucose, inflammation in obesity
    (HealthDay)—The bacterial cell wall-derived muramyl dipeptide (MDP) postbiotic lowers adipose inflammation and reduces glucose intolerance in obese mice, according to an experimental study published online April 20 in Cell Metabolism.
  • Sulforaphane, a phytochemical in broccoli sprouts, ameliorates obesity
    Sulforaphane, a phytochemical contained in broccoli sprouts at relatively high concentrations, has been known to exert effects of cancer prevention by activating a transcription factor, Nrf2 (nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2), which regulates the balance of oxidation/reduction in the cell, and by enhancing the anti-oxidation ability of the body and detoxication of chemical compounds. On the other hand, when the balance of oxidation/reduction is deteriorated due to obesity, it has been known to lead to pathogenesis of various diseases. The effects of sulforaphane on obesity were, however, unclear.
  • Making metabolically active brown fat from white fat-derived stem cells
    Researchers have demonstrated the potential to engineer brown adipose tissue, which has therapeutic promise to treat metabolic diseases such as obesity and type 2 diabetes, from white adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs). The study describes a method to produce brown fat tissue, which exists in only small amounts in adults, and is published in Tissue Engineering, Part A.
  • Study shows adipose stem cells may be the cell of choice for therapeutic applications
    An international team of researchers, funded by Morris Animal Foundation, has shown that adipose (fat) stem cells might be the preferred stem cell type for use in canine therapeutic applications, including orthopedic diseases and injury.
  • Stem cells collected from fat may have use in anti-aging treatments
    Adult stem cells collected directly from human fat are more stable than other cells - such as fibroblasts from the skin - and have the potential for use in anti-aging treatments, according to researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. They made the discovery after developing a new model to study chronological aging of these cells. They published their findings this month in the journal Stem Cells.
  • New study compares bone-inducing properties of 3-D-printed mineralized scaffolds
    A new study of bone formation from stem cells seeded on 3D-printed bioactive scaffolds combined with different mineral additives showed that some of the scaffold mineral composites induced bone-forming activity better than others. The properties and potential to use these bioactive scaffolds in bone regeneration applications are discussed in an article published in Tissue Engineering, Part A.
  • Silver ion-coated medical devices could fight MRSA while creating new bone
    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections are caused by a type of staph bacteria that has become resistant to the antibiotics used to treat ordinary staph infections. The rise of MRSA infections is limiting the treatment options for physicians and surgeons. Now, an international team of researchers, led by Elizabeth Loboa, dean of the University of Missouri College of Engineering, has used silver ion-coated scaffolds, or biomaterials that are created to hold stem cells, which slow the spread of or kill MRSA while regenerating new bone. Scientists feel that the biodegradable and biocompatible scaffolds could be the first step in the fight against MRSA in patients.
  • Giving the messages from fat cells a positive spin to prevent diabetes
    Losing weight appears to reset the chemical messages that fat cells send to other parts of the body that otherwise would encourage the development of Type 2 diabetes, substantially reducing the risk of that disease, a team led by Children's National Health System researchers report in a new study. The findings offer hope to the nearly 2 billion adults who are overweight or obese worldwide that many of the detrimental effects of carrying too much weight can recede, even on the molecular level, once they lose weight.

 

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