PubMed DB- Latest Entries for Mesenchymal Stem Cells
PubMed DB- Latest Entries for Mesenchymal Stem Cells

PubMed- Latest Free Papers on MSCs

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PubMed comprises more than 26 million citations for biomedical literature from MEDLINE, life science journals, and online books. Citations may include links to full-text content from PubMed Central and publisher web sites. 

The query  I made on PubMed for this section of the page, was Free Papers  AND on "Mesenchymal + Stromal + Cells". The outcome thereof  (10 returns) you will find below- of course, during the course of time, this RSS feed most likely will look different all the time- and that is of course the purpose and genial thing about RSS feeds- you always get the latest and most current stuff..

 

 

pubmed: mesenchymal stem cel...

NCBI: db=pubmed; Term=mesenchymal stem cells AND (free full text[sb])
  • Enhanced Homing Technique of Mesenchymal Stem Cells Using Iron Oxide Nanoparticles by Magnetic Attraction in Olfactory-Injured Mouse Models.
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    Enhanced Homing Technique of Mesenchymal Stem Cells Using Iron Oxide Nanoparticles by Magnetic Attraction in Olfactory-Injured Mouse Models.

    Int J Mol Sci. 2018 May 05;19(5):

    Authors: Yun WS, Choi JS, Ju HM, Kim MH, Choi SJ, Oh ES, Seo YJ, Key J

    Abstract
    Intranasal delivery of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to the olfactory bulb is a promising approach for treating olfactory injury. Additionally, using the homing phenomenon of MSCs may be clinically applicable for developing therapeutic cell carriers. Herein, using superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) and a permanent magnet, we demonstrated an enhanced homing effect in an olfactory model. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles with rhodamine B (IRBs) had a diameter of 5.22 ± 0.9 nm and ζ-potential of +15.2 ± 0.3 mV. IRB concentration of 15 µg/mL was injected with SPIONs into MSCs, as cell viability significantly decreased when 20 μg/mL was used (p ≤ 0.005) compared to in controls. The cells exhibited magnetic attraction in vitro. SPIONs also stimulated CXCR4 (C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4) expression and CXCR4-SDF-1 (Stromal cell-derived factor 1) signaling in MSCs. After injecting magnetized MSCs, these cells were detected in the damaged olfactory bulb one week after injury on one side, and there was a significant increase compared to when non-magnetized MSCs were injected. Our results suggest that SPIONs-labeled MSCs migrated to injured olfactory tissue through guidance with a permanent magnet, resulting in better homing effects of MSCs in vivo, and that iron oxide nanoparticles can be used for internalization, various biological applications, and regenerative studies.

    PMID: 29734748 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

  • Mesenchymal stem cells and their conditioned medium can enhance the repair of uterine defects in a rat model.
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    Mesenchymal stem cells and their conditioned medium can enhance the repair of uterine defects in a rat model.

    J Chin Med Assoc. 2018 03;81(3):268-276

    Authors: Ho CH, Lan CW, Liao CY, Hung SC, Li HY, Sung YJ

    Abstract
    BACKGROUND: Our aim was to examine the roles of mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) transplantation in the repair of large uterine defects.
    METHODS: Uterine defects were created in both uterine horns of female rats by a punch instrument, and bone marrow-derived MSCs, MSC-conditioned medium (MSC-CM) or vehicle were injected into the myometrium around the defect. The rate of uterine defect repair was monitored on day 2 and 4 after operation. Cytokine array of MSC-CM was performed, followed by neutralizing antibody experiments to clarify the exact cytokine participating in the MSC-CM-enhanced wound repair.
    RESULTS: Transplantation of MSCs, but not myometrial cells, significantly enhanced uterine defect repair. The transplanted MSCs were detected in the uterine horn with no signs of rejection on day 4 after transplantation, when the MSC-transplanted uterine wound was nearly healed. Moreover, uterine defect repair was also accelerated by injection of MSC-CM, indicating the paracrine effects of MSCs on uterine wound healing. Cytokine array analysis further revealed that MSC-CM contained abundant cytokines and chemokines, among which high levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6) were found. Additionally, antibodies against IL-6 were shown to block MSC-CM-enhanced uterine defect repair.
    CONCLUSION: This study demonstrated that transplantation of MSCs could enhance uterine defect repair by paracrine effects involving IL-6, which are findings that may be applied to facilitate uterine wound healing in the removal of huge intramural masses.

    PMID: 28882732 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

 

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