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Medical Xpress Mesenchymal Cells News Query

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The News summary below is based on the query - "Mesenchymal + Cells"
 

Medical Xpress - latest medical and health news stories

Medical Xpress internet news portal provides the latest news on Health and Medicine.
  • Therapeutic form of arsenic is a potential treatment for deadly type of brain cancer
    From Sherlock Holmes to Agatha Christie, arsenic is often the poison of choice in popular whodunits. But in ultra-low dosage, and in the right form, this naturally occurring chemical element can be a potent force against cancer.
  • Blood vessel 'master gene' discovery could lead to treatments for liver disease
    Scientists have identified a key gene in blood vessels which could provide a new way to assess and potentially treat liver disease.
  • Study finds N-alpha-acetyltransferase D (NatD) promotes lung cancer progression
    Researchers at Nanjing University and their collaborators have found that NatD, which mediates N-alpha-terminal acetylation (Nt-acetylation) of histone H4, promotes lung cancer progression by preventing histone H4 serine phosphorylation to activate the transcription factor Slug, a key regulator of the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Their results are published in Nature Communications.
  • Areas of glioblastoma tumors correlate with separate subtypes of glioma stem cells
    A new study published in the Oct. 9 issue of the journal Nature Medicine demonstrates, for the first time, that glioblastoma (GBM), the most common and most lethal brain tumor, is driven by two distinct subsets of cancer stem cells. Moreover, each subtype of glioma stem cells is driven by distinct transcriptional programs for growth and treatment resistance, and these different cell populations correspond to well-known morphological differences within the GBM itself.
  • Boosting sarcoma cell death
    Ewing sarcomas – rare, aggressive childhood cancers – are derived from mesenchymal cells in bone and soft tissues, and children with metastatic disease have poor survival.
  • Researchers describe mechanism that underlies age-associated bone loss
    A major health problem in older people is age-associated osteoporosis—the thinning of bone and the loss of bone density that increases the risk of fractures. Often this is accompanied by an increase in fat cells in the bone marrow.
  • Mesenchymal stem cells offer novel treatment approach for Crohn's disease fistula
    A growing body of clinical evidence shows that transplantation of a patient's own mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to achieve a cure and prevent recurrent of Crohn's disease-related fistula can be a safe and effective addition to surgery. A comprehensive review of the latest studies of MSC transplantation for Crohn's fistula and a comparison of MSC versus hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation is published in Human Gene Therapy.
  • Researchers identify possible new target in fight against lung cancer
    Researchers at Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) have identified a molecule called miR-124 in non-small cell lung cancer cells that plays a regulatory role in the cancer cells' fate—determining whether or not the specific subtype of cancer cell will undergo programmed cell death.
  • Lab-grown bone cell breakthrough heralds new benefits for orthopaedics
    Technology originally developed to detect gravitational waves is being used to generate tissue engineered bone grafts for future use in orthopaedic medicine, scientists report in a new paper published today.
  • Internal mechanism found to be responsible for the limitless growth potential of epithelial tumours
    Researchers from the Development and Growth Control Laboratory at IRB Barcelona have identified the cell types and molecular mechanism responsible for the unlimited growth potential of epithelial tumours (carcinomas) and demonstrated that the growth of these tumours is independent of its microenvironment. "In epithelial tumours caused by chromosomal instability or loss of cell polarity, the interaction between two tumour cell populations drives malignant growth," explains Marco Milán, ICREA Research Professor and head of the laboratory.
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