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Medical Xpress Mesenchymal Cells News Query

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The News summary below is based on the query - "Mesenchymal + Cells"
 

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  • How a non-coding RNA encourages cancer growth and metastasis
    A mechanism that pushes a certain gene to produce a non-coding form of RNA instead of its protein-coding alternative can promote the growth of cancer, report researchers at the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) in an article published online ahead of print on August 21, 2017 by Nature Cell Biology. The non-coding RNA soaks up a microRNA that prevents epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, one of the key features of tumor development.
  • Researchers discover potential cancer treatment breakthrough
    Patients undergoing conventional chemotherapy for certain cancers could potentially receive more effective and less toxic drug treatment. In a July issue of the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), Dong Zhang Ph.D., associate professor of Biomedical Sciences at New York Institute of Technology College of Osteopathic Medicine (NYITCOM) and a team of researchers detail findings that suggest new synthetic lethal interactions could inhibit the growth of tumors in mesenchymal cells, cells that develop into connective tissue such as those found in bones, soft tissues, and the central nervous system.
  • Scientists create stem cell therapy for lung fibrosis conditions
    A team of scientists from the UNC School of Medicine and North Carolina State University (NCSU) has developed promising research towards a possible stem cell treatment for several lung conditions, such as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and cystic fibrosis—often-fatal conditions that affect tens of millions of Americans.
  • Comprehensive sequencing program shows promise of precision medicine for advanced cancer
    The average metastatic cancer has more genetic mutations than are seen in early stage tumors, a new study finds.
  • Gene-regulatory factors shown to improve pancreatic cancer response to chemotherapy
    Pancreatic cancer is a particularly devastating disease because of the difficulty of identifying it at an early stage, and the difficulty of treating it when discovered at a late stage. Although various treatment options such as surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy are available, the mortality rate remains extremely high, so efforts are increasingly being targeted at improving its detection and treatment.
  • Using your own stem cells to help your body heal osteoarthritis
    The truth came crashing home last year—a perfect storm of faulty genetics, the unrelenting march of age, and every athletic mishap I've ever stumbled through.
  • Estrogen regulates pathological changes of bones via bone lining cells
    The female sex hormone estrogen plays an important role in the structural stability of bones. To date, however, it had been unclear exactly which cells were involved in the hormone's protective function in preventing changes in bone density. Researchers at Vetmeduni Vienna were able to show for the first time that estrogen uses a certain cell type as a "mediator" for its beneficial effects on bone. When estrogen binds to these so-called "bone lining cells", which cover the bone surfaces, it regulates the expression of a protein called RANKL in these cells. Estrogen deficiency leads to uncontrolled expression of RANKL, which can trigger pathological changes in the bones. The results were published in Scientific Reports.
  • Researchers report regenerative effects of low-dose growth factors for bone defect healing
    Researchers compared the effects of three bone growth factors to bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2)—the most commonly used agent for repair of large bone defects, which is not without risks at the doses required—and showed significant bone-healing effects including the formation of new blood vessels at low doses relative to BMP2. These findings, which suggest that the osteogenic factors Nell-1, HMGB1, and CCN2 could enhance bone defect repair using biomaterials, without the need to harvest patient tissue, are reported in Tissue Engineering, Part A.
  • Researchers engineer 3-D hydrogels for tissue-specific cartilage repair
    Unlike the one-size-fits-all, homogeneous approach to tissue engineering for cartilage replacement, a new study reports the ability to encapsulate cartilage-forming chondrocytes and mesenchymal stem cells in 3D hydrogels within a stiffness gradient. Researchers describe the formation of articular cartilage that shows zonal organization of the cells as it appears in native cartilage, as reported in an article be published in Tissue Engineering, Part A.
  • Using a microRNA to shift the makeup of glioblastoma subtypes
    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), an extremely aggressive brain cancer, is a very complex disease. It is characterized by a fast-growing tumor in the brain composed of many subpopulations of cells, including glioblastoma stem cells, which play a crucial role in glioblastoma initiation, expansion and therapy-resistance. GBM's diverse make up - termed heterogeneity - is of clinical importance because it is a key factor that leads to treatment failure, allowing the tumor to become resistant to treatment or for cancer to recur.
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