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Medical Xpress Mesenchymal Cells News Query

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The News summary below is based on the query - "Mesenchymal + Cells"
 

Medical Xpress - latest medical and health news stories

Medical Xpress internet news portal provides the latest news on Health and Medicine.
  • Metastatic breast cancer cells use hedgehog to 'evilize' docile neighbors
    A University of Colorado Cancer Center study published today in Nature Communications shows that metastatic breast cancer cells signal neighboring cells in ways that allow otherwise anchored cells to metastasize. The work pinpoints a promising link in the chain of signaling that, when broken, could reduce the metastatic potential of the disease.
  • Lab-grown organoids hold promise for patient treatments
    Ophir Klein is growing teeth, which is just slightly less odd than what Jeffrey Bush is growing – tissues that make up the face. Jason Pomerantz is growing muscle; Sarah Knox is growing salivary glands; and Edward Hsiao is printing 3-D bone using a machine that looks about as complex as a clock radio.
  • Major research initiative explores how our bones and muscles age, new ways to block their decline
    With age, the form and function of our bones and muscles drop off, putting us as increased risk for frailty and falls.
  • Stem cells yield nature's blueprint for body's vasculature
    In the average adult human, there are an estimated 100,000 miles of capillaries, veins and arteries—the plumbing that carries life-sustaining blood to every part of the body, including vital organs such as the heart and the brain.
  • Study implicates two genetic variants in bicuspid aortic valve development
    Researchers are working to determine why the aortic valve doesn't form correctly in patients with the most common congenital heart defect: bicuspid aortic valve.
  • Stem cells show promise – but they also have a darker side
    Everyone seems to be excited about stem cells. Their excellent promise as a treatment for a range of diseases and injuries mean almost guaranteed coverage for research. While some types of stem cells are already being used in treatment – for treating diseases of the blood and leukaemia, for example, multiple sclerosis and problems in the bone, skin and eye – there's still a lot of hype and exaggeration, with some even selling empty promises to seriously ill or injured patients.
  • Caution urged in using PRP or stem cells to treat young athletes' injuries
    Physicians, parents and coaches should be cautious when considering treating injured young athletes with platelet rich plasma (PRP), stem cells or other types of regenerative medicine, says a nationally recognized sports medicine clinician and researcher at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine and UHealth Sports Medicine Institute.
  • Another reason to exercise: Burning bone fat—a key to better bone health
    It's a fat-burning secret anyone interested in bone health should know. For the first time, UNC School of Medicine researchers show that exercising burns the fat found within bone marrow and offers evidence that this process improves bone quality and the amount of bone in a matter of weeks.
  • New gelatin devices that imitate the activity of the body in bone regeneration
    Regenerative medicine is a discipline that is continually growing and encompasses a whole arsenal of therapeutic strategies, from recombinant proteins and stem cells right up to materials and matrices designed to release drugs and growth factors. The NanoBioCel group in the UPV/EHU's Faculty of Pharmacy has developed one of these scaffolds, or matrices, for cases of critical bone defects, like those that can generate themselves in situations such as burns, injuries or tumour extractions; these scaffolds are designed to temporarily replace the matrix of the bone and help to regenerate bone tissue.
  • Cancer metastasis: The unexpected perils of hypoxia
    The low oxygen concentrations that prevail in many tumors enhance their propensity to metastasize to other tissues. Researchers at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich led by Professor Heiko Hermeking have now uncovered the molecular mechanism that links the two phenomena.
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