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Medical Xpress Mesenchymal Cells News Query

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The News summary below is based on the query - "Mesenchymal + Cells"
 

Medical Xpress - latest medical and health news stories

Medical Xpress internet news portal provides the latest news on Health and Medicine.
  • Researchers identify epigenetic orchestrator of pancreatic cancer cells
    Genentech researchers have identified an enzyme that shifts pancreatic cancer cells to a more aggressive, drug-resistant state by epigenetically modifying the cells' chromatin. The study, which will be published December 11 in the Journal of Cell Biology, suggests that targeting this enzyme could make pancreatic cancer cells more vulnerable to existing therapies that currently have only limited effect against this deadly form of cancer.
  • Scientists create successful mass production system for bioengineered livers
    Researchers report creating a biologically accurate mass-production platform that overcomes major barriers to bioengineering human liver tissues suitable for therapeutic transplant into people.
  • Harvesting stem cells from amniotic fluid
    Amniotic fluid, the protective liquid surrounding an unborn baby, is discarded as medical waste during caesarean section deliveries. However, there is increasing evidence that this fluid is a source of valuable biological material, including stem cells with the potential for use in cell therapy and regenerative medicine. A team of scientists and clinicians at Lund University in Sweden have now developed a multi-step method, including a unique collection device and new cell harvesting and processing techniques, that enables term amniotic fluid to be safely harvested for large quantities of cells.
  • Scientists help explain how dietary fat affects stem cell differentiation
    You are what you eat when it comes to fat, report scientists from McGovern Medical School at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) in the journal Science Advances.
  • Invasive cells in head and neck tumors predict cancer spread
    Head and neck tumors that contain cells undergoing a partial epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition—which transforms them from neatly organized blocks into irregular structures that extrude into the surrounding environment—are more likely to invade and spread to other parts of the body, according to a new study led by researchers from Mass. Eye and Ear, Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) and the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard. In a report published online in Cell, the researchers have created the first atlas of head and neck cancer, revealing the many different kinds of cells, cancerous and non-cancerous, in primary head and neck tumors and their metastases. The findings provide important clues as to how head and neck cancers metastasize, and may have implications for other common cancers as well.
  • Decoding the molecular mechanisms of ovarian cancer progression
    Ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynecologic malignancy in the United States, resulting in an estimated 14,100 deaths and 22,500 new cases in 2017 alone. This high mortality is primarily caused by resistance to therapy and the diagnosis of ovarian cancer after it has already metastasized, which occurs in approximately 80 percent of patients.
  • Researchers identify a potential molecular trigger for invasiveness in prostate cancer cells
    A small protein modification can trigger the aggressive migratory and invasive properties of prostate cancer cells, according to new research published on the cover of Oncotarget. The findings give greater insight into how cancers can move from one location in the body to another, and could help develop more effective therapies in the future.
  • Study shows cell signaling interaction may prevent key step in lung cancer progression
    New findings from University of Kentucky faculty published in Scientific Reports reveals a novel cell signaling interaction that may prevent a key step in lung cancer progression.
  • Researchers report findings on the effects of fat on stem cells
    You really are what you eat—especially when it comes to fats, according to a study this week in the journal Science Advances that was co-authored by Rice University undergraduate Allison Skinkle and colleagues at the Laboratory of Membrane Biology at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston's McGovern Medical School.
  • Stem cells from muscle could address diabetes-related circulation problems
    Stem cells taken from muscle tissue could promote better blood flow in patients with diabetes who develop peripheral artery disease, a painful complication that can require surgery or lead to amputation.
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