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Medical Xpress Mesenchymal Cells News Query

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The News summary below is based on the query - "Mesenchymal + Cells"
 

Medical Xpress - latest medical and health news stories

Medical Xpress internet news portal provides the latest news on Health and Medicine.
  • Researchers engineer human bone marrow tissue
    Researchers have developed an artificial tissue in which human blood stem cells remain functional for a prolonged period of time. Scientists from the University of Basel, University Hospital Basel, and ETH Zurich have reported their findings in the scientific journal PNAS.
  • Defects in tissue trigger disease-like transformation of cells
    Homeowners know that one little termite can lead to big problems: while termites are efficient at gnawing away at wood, they can do even more damage if the wood is already broken or has another defect.
  • Scientists identify novel cellular mechanism that can lead to cancer metastasis
    Scientists at the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute have added a new dimension to the understanding of how cells alter their communication with one another during development, wound healing, and the spread of cancer.
  • Genes of different importance for brain cancer
    Two genes play important roles for the formation of malignant cancer in the brain. One gene prevents the formation of the tumour, while another gene promotes the tumour. This is shown in a new dissertation at Umeå University, Sweden.
  • Enzyme blocker stops growth of deadly brain tumor
    Investigators were able to halt the growth of glioblastoma, an aggressive form of brain cancer, by inhibiting an enzyme called CDK5, according to a Northwestern Medicine study published in Cell Reports.
  • Tissue-engineered human pancreatic cells successfully treat diabetic mice
    Researchers tissue-engineered human pancreatic islets in a laboratory that develop a circulatory system, secrete hormones like insulin and successfully treat sudden-onset type 1 diabetes in transplanted mice.
  • Kidney cells from amniotic fluid obtained from cesarean section at delivery
    Amniotic fluid can be routinely obtained without harming the mother or the fetus. Researchers have previously demonstrated that amniotic fluid contains mesenchymal stem cells with great differentiation and regenerative potential. Importantly, amniotic fluid stem cells are immune privileged, non-carcinogenic and their potential clinical applications such as cell-replacement therapies to treat bone defects, ischemic stroke, bladder dysfunction and pulmonary disease have been described. However, the origin of amniotic fluid stem cells is not understood.
  • New insights into blood vessel growth
    How new blood vessels form in mammals, for example, during development or after injury, is imperfectly understood. Scientists at Goethe University have now shed light on this process, showing that single cells in the innermost layer of blood vessels proliferate after injury, and in so doing, make a significant contribution to the formation of new vessels.
  • Researchers report on tumor transition states
    Tumor heterogeneity describes the differences between different cells within a given tumor. These differences have major implications for the diagnosis, prognosis, and therapy of cancer patients. Different mechanisms have been proposed to account for tumor heterogeneity such as epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT), a process in which epithelial tumor cells loose their adhesion and acquire mesenchymal migratory properties that are associated with metastasis and resistance to therapy. Cells with different degree of EMT could exhibit different metastatic potential, although this possibility has not been investigated so far.
  • Researchers succeed in cultivating cartilage from stem cells
    Researchers have produced stable joint cartilage from adult stem cells originating from bone marrow. This was made possible by inducing specific molecular processes occurring during embryonic cartilage formation, as researchers from the University and University Hospital of Basel report in the scientific journal PNAS.
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