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Medical Xpress Mesenchymal Cells News Query

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The News summary below is based on the query - "Mesenchymal + Cells"
 

Medical Xpress - latest medical and health news stories

Medical Xpress internet news portal provides the latest news on Health and Medicine.
  • Genes activated in metastasis also drive the first stages of tumour growth
    In spite of the difference between the cell functions responsible for giving rise to a tumour and that give rise to metastasis, studies at IRB Barcelona using the fly Drosophila melanogaster reveal that some genes can drive both phenomena.
  • Why get a filling when you could print a new smile?
    Twinges. Painful teeth. About one in 10 people suffer from dental sensitivity caused by worn enamel. But rather than providing short-term solutions like special toothpastes or fillings, new techniques could print whole new layers of enamel onto teeth – or even stimulate the body to grow new ones.
  • Undergraduate student uncovers genes associated with aggressive form of brain cancer
    When Leland Dunwoodie, an undergraduate researcher in biochemistry, approached his PI about wanting to start research on "some human stuff" in the spring of 2016, he didn't imagine it would lead to the discovery of 22 genes that are implicated in glioblastoma, the most aggressive type of brain cancer.
  • Insight into chromatin therapies for breast cancer could aid personalized medicine
    Most traditional chemotherapy for cancer has dangerous side effects, but new research is finding ways to develop 'targeted agents' that reduce the side effects and are better tailored to individual patient needs. While these innovations are exciting, a new study shows how certain cancer inhibitors need to be examined more carefully to better understand fine-grained effects and counter-effects, which could yield more effective and safer therapies.
  • Unexpected findings prompt re-evaluation of how the intestine repairs itself
    Researchers at Baylor College of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and the University of California, San Francisco have gained new insights into how the small intestine, one of the fastest renewing tissues in the human body, repairs itself after injury caused by intestinal rotavirus infection. Their findings have led them to propose that, contrary to the current thinking, how the intestine repairs itself seems to depend on the type of damage, and they found that triggers that were previously thought to be unimportant are actually essential for repairing virus-caused injury. The study appears in Cell Reports.
  • Researchers identify gene responsible for mesenchymal stem cells' stem-ness'
    Many doctors, researchers and patients are eager to take advantage of the promise of stem cell therapies to heal damaged tissues and replace dysfunctional cells. Hundreds of ongoing clinical trials are currently delivering these therapies to patients worldwide.
  • New molecular probes to allow non-destructive analysis of bioengineered cartilage
    A new study describes novel probes that enable non-invasive, non-destructive, direct monitoring of the differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in real-time during the formation of engineered cartilage to replace damaged or diseased tissue. These molecular probes make it possible to assess the quality of the cartilaginous tissue and its suitability for implantation as it is forming, and to make modifications to enhance the multi-step process of MSC differentiation into chondrocytes "on the go," as described in a study published in Tissue Engineering, Part A.
  • New stem cell method sheds light on a tell-tale sign of heart disease
    While refining ways to grow arterial endothelial cells in the lab, a regenerative biology team at the Morgridge Institute for Research unexpectedly unearthed a powerful new model for studying a hallmark of vascular disease.
  • Cellular hitchhikers aid recovery from spinal cord injury
    The healing effects of stem cells in spinal cord injury can be aided by their ability to hitch intercellular rides to specific anti-inflammatory cells called M2 macrophages, Yale researchers report.
  • Phase III clinical trials for stem cell-based cartilage regeneration therapy have started
    A group of researchers at Osaka University developed a synthetic tissue using synovium-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for treating damaged cartilage, which had previously been incurable and had no effective therapies.
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